AVS & BVA Student Travel Grants 2018 - NOW OPEN!

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AVS & BVA Student Travel Grants 2018 - NOW OPEN!

As AVS and BVA student members you are eligible to apply for a travel grant to carry out a research project overseas. There is one AVS award and two BVA awards available: 

AVS

AVS Connect Award

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This will provide financial assistance (£250) for a vet student to attend international meetings or events as a representative of the UK and Ireland veterinary student body.
- More information can be found here
- The application form can be found here
- Deadline is 28th February 2018
Terms and conditions can be found at the bottom of this page. 

BVA

BVA Overseas Travel Grant

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Four awards of £500 to undertake a research project which contributes to development and welfare in a developing country. Previous projects have included: helminths in Sri Lankan Elephants, effective breeding in Peruvian Alpaca Herds and Wildebeest-associated Malignant Catarrhal Fever in Kenya!

Harry Steele-Bodger Memorial Travel Scholarship

Intended to allow a visit to a Veterinary or agricultural school or a research institute. It is open to penultimate and final year veterinary students. 

For more information please see the BVA website - which can be accessed here

 

 

Terms and Conditions of AVS Connect Award 

Terms & Conditions:
1. Eligibility: Applicants must be members of the AVS i.e. currently studying Veterinary Medicine/Science at a university in the UK or Ireland.
2. Submissions can be made at any point in the year but the deadline is 28th February 2018
3. Application review and final decisions will be made within the 4 weeks of submission.
4. Grant payments will be made as soon as possible after the decisions have been made.
5. Successful applicants that receive grants are expected to submit a 500 word report with photo of their experience suitable to be published in JAVS and on our website. 
6. Retrospective applications will not be considered
7. Should the applicant not attend the event/meeting the grant should be returned to AVS in full.

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EMS - Unpaid Internship or Not?

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EMS - Unpaid Internship or Not?

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There is currently a bill going through the House of Lords which is seeking to ban unpaid internships - remind anyone of EMS?? Unfortunately, EMS would not count as an unpaid internship as it is done whilst we are at University and therefore is work experience rather than an internship. 

Introduced by Lord Holmes of Richmond, the bill will mean that after a month of unpaid work the minimum wage will apply, saying: "the practice is clearly discriminatory, crushes creatvity and competitiveness and holds individuals and our country back - it's time we consigned them to the past, to the novels of Dickens".

Last November, the proposals were blocked in the House of Commons by the Government saying that it would "undermine existing employment laws". 

References: 

- BBC News, 2017, Public "backs ban on long unpaid internships"
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-41717401 (07/11/17)

- BBC News, 2016, Unpaid internships reform plan blocked in Commons
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-37874269

- BBC News, 2017, Unpaid internships likened to modern slavery in Lords debate
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-41765381

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Vet Futures Ambassador Training Day

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Vet Futures Ambassador Training Day

The Ambassadors!

The Ambassadors!

At the end of October AVS held its first training day for the new Vet Futures Student Ambassadors. Two students from each vet university were chosen to become ambassadors and attend the day which included training on communication, leadership, presentation and emphasised student-led projects. 

The ambassadors each chose themes to focus on which varied from careers, animal welfare and mental health. The Vet Futures project was created in 2014 to predict the issues that will face the vet profession in the next ten years. 

Eleanor Robertson, AVS president, said: "AVS has been excited about the Vet Futures project from day one and we want to play our part in making it a success. As students, our members are the future of this profession and they should therefore be active in shaping it."

A massive thank you to the BVA and RCVS for hosting the event and the Veterinary Schools Council for their support.  

More information can be found here

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Vet News - September 2017

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Vet News - September 2017

Vet News – September 2017

1. Mandatory CCTV in Slaughterhouses in England (and potentially Scotland and Wales)

In August the Environment Secretary, Michael Gove announced that English abattoirs will have to install CCTV in an effort to improve animal welfare. He also announced that official veterinarians will have unrestricted access to the footage. At the beginning of September, the Scottish Government announced that it will begin a consultation on implementing the same measures.

More information can be found: 
- BVA
- BBC

2.       Breeding is Vets’ Greatest Worry

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A BVA survey found that vets’ biggest concern was the poor breeding of puppies. This can not only lead to health and behavioural issues but also welfare ones. The survey also highlighted worries about the breeding of brachycephalic breeds who can suffer severe respiratory issues due to their characteristic flat face.

More information can be found:
- BVA

3.       Two Final Year Students Receive Prestigious BVA Travel Grant

Two final year students, one from Cambridge and one from the Royal Veterinary College, were announced as recipients of an overseas travel grant to support their projects. Dominic Clark’s (RVC) project focuses on the arrowhead dogfish on Limasawa Island in the Philippines focusing on the conservation of the species. Sara Robson (Cambridge) investigated bovine brucellosis and tuberculosis in Ethiopian dairy herds and was also this year’s recipient of the Harry Steele-Bodger Memorial. Congratulations to both!

More information can be found:
- BVA

4.       Tuberculosis Update

Northern Ireland have announced that they will be developing further measures to try and eradicate bovine TB. In England, DEFRA authorised eight new areas of badger control as well as launching an advisory scheme for affected farmers. The scheme will offer farm visits as well as a helpline for farmers. DEFRA hopes that this will help to eradicate and manage TB in England.

More information can be found: 
- Farming Life
- DEFRA

5.       Rise in Animals Killed Without Stunning.

Slaughter without stunning represents a massive welfare issue for thousands of farm animals every year. However, since the 2013 exemption notice for animals that are slaughtered for religious purposes, the number of animals that are being slaughtered without stunning has increased. For sheep and goats, it has increased from 15% to almost 25%. Many vets are campaigning for the re-introduction of a law that guarantees all animals will be stunned before slaughter

More information can be found:
- BVA

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The BVA 2017 Animal Welfare Foundation Discussion Forum

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The BVA 2017 Animal Welfare Foundation Discussion Forum

The BVA 2017 Animal Welfare Foundation Discussion Forum

By Meg Rawlins, RVC

Monday 5th June marked the 4th BVA Animal Welfare Foundation Discussion Forum.  With promise of great debate on some interesting animal welfare topics by world-renowned experts, a House of Commons reception after, discounted student tickets and food- who wouldn’t attend? I jumped at the chance to go.

There were three sessions throughout the day, the first being ‘Is modern life incompatible with pet ownership?’. Discussing how modern lifestyle are potentially conflicting with the 5-animal welfare needs and how we can combat this, focusing on dogs and cats. The main welfare issues facing both species were covered and there were many interesting questions brought up by the audience; including how we could combat public's perceptions of brachycephalic breeds and how this was an issue in not only dogs but cats also, as well as questioning how we could educate the population about current animal welfare issues.

The second session, and my favourite of the day; ‘Are vets failing our horses’ prompted the most conflicting viewpoints.  It covered the topics of when geriatric equine medicine has gone too far, how to approach euthanasia and the controversial issue of whether we are pushing our sport horses too far. People questioned the ethical issues surrounding horse racing, different methods of euthanasia in equids and what can be done to improve the welfare of horses used for sport.

The final session explored the future of animal welfare. The first half was ‘On the Pulse’ and was all about animal establishment licensing. This was something which I admittedly knew very little on, but the discussion was engaging and informative. The speakers spoke about the regulation of licensing for animal establishments, what improvements could be made and the impact of loss of funding for local authorities.  In the next part of the session, projects funded by the Animal Welfare Foundation were presented. The first was research exploring advisory and communication strategies used by cattle veterinarians and discussed something called ‘motivational interviewing’ which I recommend you to research and try and apply! The second research project was all about improving the assessment of lameness in sheep, something which I personally found extremely relevant as it related to my current university module.

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After a short break, we were then invited to attend what had been described as a ‘legendary’ reception in the House of Commons terrace. Whilst saddened that no MPs could be in the building due to the upcoming election, I was excited to meet an array of professionals all with the same common goal; improving animal welfare. The opening speech by Gudrun kicked off the reception to a great start and I had a fun evening of networking whilst consuming the seemingly unlimited amount of drinks and veggie samosas. I was amazed that I was the only student who attended the reception as it was a great opportunity!

I had a fantastic day and learnt a lot and will try to attend next year’s event (if my rotation schedule allows!). I recommend to anyone reading who has an interest in animal welfare to go next year!

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AVS Have a Day Out at the RCVS' Royal College Day 2017

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AVS Have a Day Out at the RCVS' Royal College Day 2017

AVS Have a Day Out at the RCVS' Royal College Day 2017

Some of the AVS Committee with Chris Tufnell

Some of the AVS Committee with Chris Tufnell

On the 7th July 2017 AVS were honoured to be invited to the RCVS' annual Royal College Day at the Royal Institute of British Architects in central London; this is a celebration of the profession and where the future president of the RCVS is elected.

For 2018 this will be Professor Stephen May from the RVC; in his maiden speech Professor May supported about the importance of learning and support for new graduates - two topics close to AVS' heart!

All the committee members who attended had a lovely time in the sun, meeting some amazing people and making sure all vet students were represented at the top level of our profession. AVS would like to thank Chris Tufnell (the incoming RCVS Senior Vice President) for the very kind invitation. 

 

 

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Opinion: Screening Sixth Formers to Curb Suicide Rates Among Vets Just Can’t Be The Answer.

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Opinion: Screening Sixth Formers to Curb Suicide Rates Among Vets Just Can’t Be The Answer.

Opinion: Screening Sixth Formers to Curb Suicide Rates Among Vets Just Can’t Be The Answer.

By Isaac Florence, RVC

Image courtesy of the Black Dog Institute, Australia

Image courtesy of the Black Dog Institute, Australia

Last week I stumbled across a tweet outlining an article from The Express about a plan to introduce mental health screening for prospective veterinary students in the UK to tackle the shockingly high rate of suicide among practising vets. The idea of this made me very angry, very quickly and not being shy to speak my mind I wrote exactly how I felt about this idea on a Facebook post which I didn’t expect to gain nearly as much attention as it did from my own friends let alone people to whom it had been shared.

I don’t claim to be fully informed about, let alone an expert in, veterinary mental health but I was quickly pointed to people who are,. Dr Rosie Allister is a vet and manager of Vetlife Helpline who has spent the last ten years studying mental health in vet students and recent graduates. Although she was cited in the original article and then berated by the Twitterati, she was quick to refute the idea that she supported this plan and said it was a “, misleading headline with potentially harmful consequences. I hope students can hear that the profession does not agree with this.”

Although it’s reassuring to see those directly involved in veterinary mental health are against this awful idea, there are certain conversations that have to be had at this point to totally shut down any possibility of this atrocious idea ever reaching fruition.

 Like many students, I am sometimes apprehensive talking about mental health (raising questions for another day). I feel physically sick when reminded of the friends, family and classmates that have taken their own life, this topic is – to say the least – a challenge to talk about. But now, more than ever, it’s crucial to have these conversations and hope it makes it easier for vets and vet students to speak to people about their own concerns.

Many of us will have dreamed of being a vet since we were about three and continued to dream through school, exams and through our time at studying to be vets. Imagine – for a moment – that you rocked up to your interview and then after being quizzed about dosage calculations, comparative anatomy or biochemistry you will never come across again you are ushered into a room with a psychiatrist (or, more likely, a psychologist) and assessed on your mental stability. You’ve worked harder than most of your friends, received stellar results and been more stressed than ever before in your life, a period of “growing up” more intense than any other in your life, but you’re not allowed to pursue your dream because, on that day, you’re not “mentally sound”.

I don’t believe that your mental health at seventeen or eighteen is definitively reflective of your likelihood to commit suicide as a practicing vet five, six, seven, ten, twenty years down the line. It could certainly has an impact but I think having £100,000 student debt, earning half as much as a doctor, having to kill animals and break people's hearts on a daily basis whilst working long hours in a building full of lethal drugs and firearms probably has a greater impact on a vet’s disposition to commit suicide.

Harriet Mullan, who is a consultant adolescent psychiatrist in London, said screening would unhelpful and “discriminatory”. The legality of such discrimination that is not based on professional or academic grounds is somewhat questionable, it turns out.

Dr Allister is regarded as the expert on this topic within the veterinary world and to advance my argument it would be simplest to link you to her Twitter feed, but the main point is that there is “NO EVIDENCE that pre-screening vets or vet students for mental health, suicide, or personality, will reduce suicide rates” and that screening will be a waste of money better spent on support and will almost certainly drive up the suicide rate as it will reduce people’s perceived ability to speak to people about getting support. She calls for greater support for vets, allowing them to talk about stress and their own mental state as well as trying to tackle the issues that cause vets to undergo such stress in the first place.

Suicide of any kind is devastating. Institutionalised suicide is just mortifying. We, everyone involved with the profession, need to work hard and relentlessly until we can stop any and every work-related suicide in our community. We must strive to make it better, not to do so is simply not good enough.

 Vetlife is a 24 hour, 365 day a year confidential helpline charity that provides support to everyone in the veterinary profession. https://www.vetlife.org.uk 0303 040 2551
 

Students can talk to Student Nightline confidentially, between 18:00 and 08:00 each night of term time on 0207 631 0101 http://nightline.org.uk

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MSD Animal Health & FVE Scholarship 2017

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MSD Animal Health & FVE Scholarship 2017

MSD Animal Health & FVE Scholarship 2017

Due to the success of the 2016 Scholarship grant, MSD Animal Health and the Federation of Veterinarians of Europe (FVE) have extended the number of grants to thirty-six! The MSD and the FVE have released this information:

"(the) aim of the 2017 scholarship program is to enhance the academic experience of 36 veterinary students (2nd and 3rd year) taking into consideration their diversity and financial needs. We encourage qualified students to submit their applications and we wish success to all the candidates!"

The full announcement can be found here

The application can be found here and should be sent to: stagiaire@fve.org
The deadline for submission: 15 September 2017

Please, read carefully the eligibility criteria in the announcement. 
Review and selection process by FVE Review Committee supported by EAEVE and IVSA.  

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The Veterinary Invertebrate Society Summer Meeting

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The Veterinary Invertebrate Society Summer Meeting

The Veterinary Invertebrate Society Summer Meeting

The Veterinary Invertebrate Society is holding it’s summer scientific meeting at St John’s College, Cambridge on Wednesday 12th July this year, and it looks to be a great day! The programme includes presentations on: effective euthanasia of arthropods, the veterinary and legal aspects of butterfly farming, and a review of cases seen in practice among others. It will be a great opportunity to hear about the little taught field of invertebrate medicine in a sociable atmosphere.

Student price is just £25, and includes a lunch consisting of leaf cutter ant breakfast, buffalo worm and cricket falafel and a mealworm and cricket pie for dessert. Cash can be paid on the day, please email Sarah Pellett (sarah_pellett@hotmail.com) by 30th June if you wish to attend or would like more information. 

Details about the conference can be found here

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Student Funding to Increase

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Student Funding to Increase

Student Funding to Increase 

The Student Loans Company has now been able to confirm, with the Department for Education, that veterinary courses can now be considered ‘long course’ degrees in England, thus increasing the loan available to students. The move comes after considerable efforts by the Association of Veterinary Students (AVS), working alongside the Veterinary Schools Council (VSC), to have the expensive and time consuming demands of EMS placements formally recognised. Since EMS is an essential and mandatory part of the veterinary degree, AVS has long lobbied for student maintenance loans to reflect these weeks are working, not as holiday time.

Following discussions between the University of Liverpool and the Student Loans Company, the vet degree there has now been recognised as a ‘long course’ and other vet schools in England are being encouraged to register their degree as a long course and include the average number of weeks of extra-mural studies. The VSC is communicating with the English vet schools and details should be fed down to students soon. The VSC is also in discussions with the relevant bodies in Scotland to extend this action to help students studying at Glasgow and Royal Dick (Edinburgh).

This move comes at a time when the VSC, AVS and the RCVS are examining the EMS requirements, governed by RCVS and currently set at 12 weeks of pre-clinical EMS and 26 weeks of clinical EMS. The profession is continually seeking to ensure high quality, well prepared and motivated graduated enter the profession and EMS plays an important part in this. But issues regarding quality, availability and cost of EMS have been the cause of much debate.

 How much better off per weeks students would be is hard to calculate, a common theme in student finance, but it’s not an insignificant amount and will depend on household income.

For more information please click on the following links: 

- Long Course Loans (Student Finance England Website) 

- Veterinary Schools Council

- More details on EMS requirements and RCVS review

 

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Harry Steele-Bodger Memorial Travel Scholarship

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Harry Steele-Bodger Memorial Travel Scholarship

Established in 1953, to honour the former president of the BVA from 1939 to 1941, this scholarship is intended to assist a  final or a penultimate  year student visit a veterinary or agricultural school, research institute or another course of study.

WHO? Penultimate, final year (4,5,6th years) or newly graduated vets (less than 3 years). 

HOW? Please see:

MORE INFORMATION? Please see the BVA's website or email helenac@bva.co.uk for more information

 

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Brachycephalic Dogs

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Brachycephalic Dogs

Brachycephalic Dogs

Hannah Mason, AVS President 2016-2017

This week it was announced by the Telegraph that the Labrador is likely to be replaced as Britain’s most owned dogs by the French Bulldog. This breed of dog, unheard of in Britain less than ten years ago, has gained popularity through social media following the same trend of other breeds such as pugs. Many celebrities own them, with one “Frenchie’s” Instagram having 20,000+ followers.

French bulldogs and pugs are known as brachycephalic breeds and are characterised by their squashed faces, bulging eyes and numerous skin folds. They suffer from a myriad of health complaints directly related to their breeding and extreme facial conformation. Brachycephalic Airway Syndrome (BOAS) is caused by the narrowing of the upper respiratory tract, caused by their shortened upper jaw. This means that breathing is difficult. That cute snoring noise that brachycephalic dogs often make – that is them struggling for air. They often cannot run or exercise for long periods of time, suffer from heat stroke easily, and in extreme cases it can lead to collapse and sudden death. BOAS is endemic within French bulldogs – a recent study found that only 10% of those in a litter could breathe normally. It is not uncommon for their gums to be tinged blue, indicating oxygen deprivation.  This is a serious welfare concern and it seems unacceptable that even in its mildest form, it should be considered normal, and even desirable in a dog.

Although, marketed as a "cute" breed, French Bulldogs suffer from abnormalities leading to respiratory distress and eye ulcers

Although, marketed as a "cute" breed, French Bulldogs suffer from abnormalities leading to respiratory distress and eye ulcers

Eye ulcers are common in brachycephalic dogs, as their eyes significantly protrude from the skull – last summer alone I watched four pugs lose eyes after their ulcers simply refused to heal. The abnormally large size of the puppies' heads mean they very rarely able to be born naturally – instead, the mothers often require a caesarean and it's associated surgical risk. Due to the male’s narrow hips, they even find it incredibly difficult to mate naturally, with many breeders resorting to artificial insemination. This resonated with me – we are so determined to breed these animals to look a certain way, we continue even past the point at which nature stops us.

Whilst we have bred dogs to suffer this way, it also means we have the power to reverse the process. Out-crossing these dogs, with longer nosed breeds would increase the diameter of the airways and increase their quality of life dramatically. This solution has been met with horror by several breed societies who are incredibly proud of their dog’s genetics (and are in compliance with the Kennel Clubs breed standards), perhaps to detriment of their dog’s ability to breathe.

The Kennel Club, the veterinary profession and the general public all share a collective responsibility for the health and welfare of our canine population and therefore must all work together. The Kennel Club’s canine health schemes show a move in the right direction, however their recommendation to join one by the French Bulldog Club of England which still allows dogs with mild breathing difficulties to gain a “silver certificate” shows that a more serious commitment is needed. Interestingly, despite a petition which garnered over 40,000 signatures from the veterinary profession to address to the suffering of brachycephalic breeds, the Kennel Club refused to alter breed standards.

The veterinary profession must educate the general public about the dangers of owning such a breed. A culture shift is needed to stop them from being seen as desirable and instead the promotion of healthier, cross-bred dogs. It is not acceptable to continue to breed these anatomical monsters, who will suffer for a life-time merely for our personal enjoyment (or a few likes on Instagram).

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AVS and IVSA Election Results 2017

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AVS and IVSA Election Results 2017

We are very pleased to announce the results of this year's elections. Congratulations to all successful candidates, and commiserations to those that missed out.
Over 1,000 people voted this year, so thank you all for taking part!

  • Junior Vice President: Dave Charles
  • Secretary: Seamus McSorley
  • Treasurer: Katie Burden
  • Grants and Sponsorship Officer: Rebecca Mytton
  • Welfare Representative: Lucy Yarnold
  • IVSA President: Rosie Herrington
  • IVSA Exchange Officer: Tavishi Pandya
  • IVSA Promotions Officer: Lara Muttiah
  • IVSA Veterinary Public Health Officer: Radha Varadharajan 

Once again, congratulations to all the successful candidates and we're looking forward to meeting you all on the 4th of March!

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Vet Futures - the Next Generation

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Vet Futures - the Next Generation

Vet Futures, a project set up by the BVA and the RCVS, considers the issuse that will face the veterinary team in the future. They use research to engage with the profession and the public to develop action plans that represent animals, the public and the profession. Our Senior Vice President, Helena Diffey has written an article about their action plan regarding the next generation (e.g. us!) – to read the full article please click here!

 

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"Graduates not prepared for practice transition, says vet" - AVS Official Response

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"Graduates not prepared for practice transition, says vet" - AVS Official Response

"Graduates not prepared for practice transition, says vet" - AVS Official Response

Following an article published in the Vet Times (25th November 2016), the following response has been released by AVS: 

The Association of Veterinary Students welcomes Mr Robinson’s comments on updating the structure of EMS to keep pace with the profession. In the recent AVS/BVA survey 17% of students said they felt unsure the course was preparing them for their career, with 44% stating that more practical experience would be beneficial. We are grateful that this issue was raised and are happy to contribute upon further drafts of the three year plan.

The original article can be accessed here

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Buster the Boxer - A Vet Student's View on the John Lewis Christmas Advert

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Buster the Boxer - A Vet Student's View on the John Lewis Christmas Advert

And so it begins. Halloween has happened and Guy Fawkes is finished, so here comes Christmas- #BusterTheBoxer flying the flag for Christmas dogs.

The John Lewis advert was released to much fanfare as this timely reminder that the season of festive cheer has officially started. It's a nice advert, and rather than focussing on penguins or lonely men living on the moon, this year John Lewis decided to focus on something much closer to home, a trampoline and a motley crew of British wildlife.

                 Above: the star of the show, Buster the Boxer (1)

                 Above: the star of the show, Buster the Boxer (1)

It’s already been noted that the badger (which one hopes isn’t shedding TB all over the trampoline) would probably have tried to eat the hedgehog and not just have a cheeky bounce, and this isn't the place to start discussing urban fox culling, but the casting choice for Buster the Boxer is an interesting one.

A few weeks ago the BVA released their long overdue statement on brachycephalic dogs (2), expressing their concern over certain breeding practices and trying to ensure there was adequate public awareness of the problems faced by many breeds. If I had a pound for everytime I met a client on EMS that had no idea their pug was predisposed to eye/respiratory/spinal etc. problems, then I’d almost be able to afford doing EMS. A friend even heard a client remark “I got tired of the genetic problems labradors have so I decided to get a pug instead”. Pugs have been getting a lot of air time from Vision Express (3), with their advert showing a pug breaking its glasses in the snow , to a pug riding a sledge in the snow for Three mobile’s advert from 2013 (4). There have been calls in the past for the media to stop their use of pugs and other brachycephalic breeds in order to reduce the public demand for unhealthy animals, and so perhaps it’s finally not falling on deaf ears.

But hold on, it may not be Buster the pug, but boxers suffer a fair share of problems too. Perhaps the scene in which Buster waits by the bed, watching his little human jumping, he isn’t being polite but instead he can’t breathe properly. Maybe the scene where he’s staring out the window longingly, it's because his eyes are dry and painful. Maybe he runs out of the house so fast because he’s not happy being indoors all day.

So I suppose it is a step in the right direction that he’s not a pug, but we as a profession still have work to do educating the public that boxers do not make ideal pets for trampolining.

“Comparison of photographs (Photos Mary Bloom, courtesy of AKC) and skulls from a German Shepherd Dog with a wild-type skull shape (non-brachycephalic) and a brachycephalic Boxer.”- (5)

“Comparison of photographs (Photos Mary Bloom, courtesy of AKC) and skulls from a German Shepherd Dog with a wild-type skull shape (non-brachycephalic) and a brachycephalic Boxer.”- (5)

  1. John Lewis, Christmas Advert 2016, Available: https://www.youtube.com/user/JohnLewisRetail accessed: 10/11/16

  2. BVA, 2016, BVA and BSAVA statement on brachycephalic breeds, available: https://www.bva.co.uk/News-campaigns-and-policy/Newsroom/News-releases/BVA-and-BSAVA-statement-on-brachycephalic-breeds/ accessed: 10/11/16

  3. Vision Direct Christmas Advert 2015 – A Pug’s Christmas-  Available: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGAqUGjdh-M accessed: 10/11/16

  4. Three Mobile Christmas Advert 2013, Available:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NLrk259CwMw accessed: 10/11/16

  5. Regodon, S., Vivo, J.M., Franco, A., Guillen, M.T. and Robina, A., 1993. Craniofacial angle in dolicho-, meso-and brachycephalic dogs: radiological determination and application. Annals of Anatomy-Anatomischer Anzeiger, 175(4), pp.361-363.

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Medsin Autumn Weekend 2016

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Medsin Autumn Weekend 2016

With a potential affiliation in the pipeline, Medsin were kind enough to invite AVS to their Autumn weekend at the Brighton and Sussex Medical School. Medsin is a student run charity tackling global and health inequalities. They have over 30 branches across the UK which hold events and debates on issues such as, but by no means limited to, climate change, antimicrobial resistance and gender equality.

The weekend was not only a great chance to explore Brighton (who knew the seaside could be so hilly?) but also a wonderful introduction to the work that Medsin do around the country.
We started with a voting session - on the agenda were proposed changes to Medsin’s constitution and byelaws. Each branch has a vote and it was interesting to see the competitiveness of each branch to second a motion and ensure that their voice was heard. In the afternoon Dr Arianne Shahvisi gave a fascinating talk on gender and gender bias in medicine and science in 2016. This was a thought provoking introduction to the student run afternoon workshops: one discussed the role that gender played in homelessness and the other discussed stereotypes and how to confront them. During each workshop our ideas on gender perception were challenged and everyone learnt something both about themselves and the concept of gender as a whole.

That evening we were all given a flavour of Brighton’s social side starting with a delicious supper in a slightly spooky church catered for by the amazing Real Junk Food Project (who take waste food from supermarkets and create meals from it) before heading onto the beach dry, but leaving slightly soggy! We then beat a hasty retreat to a nearby bar to try and warm up!

On the Sunday, there was more voting and the election of the next hosts of the Medsin global health conference. In the afternoon there were some interesting student-led training sessions on leadership and team work skills. Not only was the Medsin autumn weekend inspiring, it was also a brilliant opportunity to meet other students from across the United Kingdom and to see how passionate they are about making the future a better place.

 

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